Archive | May 2013

3D Printing at Print 13

We’ve been evangelizing 3D printing to the traditional printing community for nearly a year now. Our stance is that 3D printing really is a lot like 2D printing. Files get created, files are submitted to print devices, prints are made, prints are finished and finally, handed off to the consumer. Certainly the file, printer, substrates and finishing methods are different, but not that much different. Along the way, our stance has been ignored and opposed, but now may finally be being accepted as self evident. Why? We just received an email newsletter from the organizers of PRINT 13, and there in the right sidebar is a conference session entitled, “3D Printing for the Commercial Printer.”

The summary describes 3D printing and goes on to say that, “Some believe that commercial printers, particularly the small printer with a physical storefront, is uniquely positioned to serve the potential new market for custom printed “things” — from promotional item and replacement parts to miniature versions of people! Learn how 3D printing just might be the next big thing in your print shop.”

While we certainly believe 3D printing is a huge opportunity for traditional printers, we don’t believe it’s limited to quick print shops. 3D printing is impacting nearly every manufacturing market from promotional products, toys, tools, automotive parts, and gadgets, to fashion, healthcare, art, and even the military. If you’re a printer with customers in any of those markets (or many more) you have an opportunity with 3D printing. And, it’s not just for “prototyping” any longer. Right now, roughly 30% of everything 3D printed is being consumed as product. By 2020, the Economist predicts that 80% will be used as finished product.

The parallels to digital printing are profound. Back in the early 90’s many in the industry said that digital printing was great for copy shops, but really didn’t have a place in commercial print. Today it’s not uncommon for commercial printers to generate 30% of their revenue or more from digital printing. In this case, history has a high likelihood of repeating itself. Those who educate themselves now, and adopt relatively quickly stand a much better chance of success with 3D printing. And in this case, printers won’t just be competing against desktop users and each other. They’ll be competing against retailers seeking to flatten their supply chains by manufacturing products on demand. Associating your brand with 3D printing now will help you stand out in a sea of 3D printing providers later.

Traditional printing companies have an opportunity to participate in the growing 3D print market and 3D4Printers.com is dedicated to helping printers make the leap. Want to learn more about 3D printing and how to add the capability at your company? CONTACT US today.

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3D Printing Anxiety Based On 2D Printing Fears?

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Image via newmoney.gov

While we’ve been off focusing on other initiatives, others have taken up the mantle that 3D printing has a lot in common with 2D printing. Check out this recent article that suggests much of the recent anxiety around 3D printing stems from lessons learned in traditional, 2D printing. For us, it’s further validation that 2D printers are doing themselves a disservice if they don’t keep a very close eye on 3D printing. Further, 3D printing needs more people from a traditional printing background.

The industry is sorting out many of the same challenges traditional printers have faced. From counterfeit, copyright, and censorship, which are mentioned in the article, to more pragmatic concerns like pre-flight and finishing, the 3D printing industry now, reminds us a lot of the digital printing industry in the early 1990’s. Others who lived through that technology evolution could bring a lot of experience to what promises to be the next industrial revolution – 3D printing.